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Events
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“Pink Triangle Legacies: Coming Out in the Shadow of the Holocaust”

The Florida Holocaust Museum 55 5th Street S, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States

Historian Dr. Jake Newsome tells the dynamic and inspiring history of the LGBTQ+ community's original pride symbol by tracing the transformation of the pink triangle from a Nazi concentration camp badge into a widespread emblem of queer liberation, pride, and community. Drawing from unexplored archival sources and original interviews, Dr. Newsome showcases the voices of 

Passage to Sweden

USF St Pete Harbor Hall 1000 3rd St S., St. Petersburg, FL, United States

Film screening and Q&A with Director, Suzannah Warlick Rescue & Escape – Passage To Sweden tells the lesser-known story of events occurring in Scandinavia and Budapest during WWII. It focuses on the heroic actions of ordinary people who saved the lives of thousands of Jews and fellow countrymen. Between 1940-1945 the sheer luck of where 

Beyond Barbed Wire

The Florida Holocaust Museum 55 5th Street S, Saint Petersburg, FL, United States

Beyond Barbed Wire, Imprisoned Without Trial: The Story of the Japanese Internment in WWII, lecture presented by Denny Kato Anti-Asian violence: a modern-day occurrence? Not at all. Fear, hatred, and racism toward the Chinese and Japanese began in the mid 1800's culminating with the incarceration of over 125,000 Japanese at the beginning of World War